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Crew Evaluation Test online for seamans about Containers Transportation During Heavy Weather

“Seagull CES marine test online about Heavy Weather Damage” (Crew Evaluation Test) will help marine specialists in preparation to exams for getting certificate of confidence.

This test contains 78 questions, you should answer on 60. Mode “Practice” and “Exam” have one difference – in “Exam” mode you can’t ask the computer to show you the right answer.

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Practice - CES test about IMSBC Code
Practice
Exam - CES test about IMSBC Code
Exam
Start test
By 31 December 1997, which ships were required to carry an approved CSM, under SOLAS 74? Select all applicable answers:
All ships.
All new ships excluding new passenger ships.
All new container ships.
All ships of 500 gt and upwards engaged in the carriage of cargoes other than solid and liquid bulk cargoes.
All ships of 500 gt and upwards.
Next question
With what does a ship’s angle of pitch vary? Select all applicable answers:
The spring, holding the twistlock cone in the “closed” position, should be resilent.
The spring, holding twistlock cone in a “closed” position, is resilient but loose.
Twistlock handles are slightly fractured.
Twistlock handles are missing.
Show result
During heavy weather what (approximate) transverse force could be imparted to a five-tier stack of forty-foot containers?
18 tonnes.
48 tonnes.
50 tonnes.
52 tonnes.
Next question
During heavy weather, what could be the approximate induced transverse wind force acting on a five-tier stack of containers?
18 tonnes.
1,8 tonnes.
36 tonnes.
4,2 tonnes.
Next question
During pitching, when will pressure changes on the forward container stacks reach their maximum values?
When the bows are rising onto a wave crest.
When a wave crest is amidships.
When the bows reverse their direction of monitor.
When the bows fail into a wave through.
Next question
For a container stowed in a position equidistant from the roll and pitch axes of your ship, what would reduce the accelerations to one quarter?
Doubling the roll period.
Quartering the pitch period.
Halving the roll period.
Halving the pitch period.
Next question
How do the accelerations always affect a container lashing system?
By slackening the turnbuckles.
By inducing forces into the entire lashing system.
By setting up vibrations throughout the system.
By causing containers to slip on their base twistlocks.
Next question
How should twistlocks be greased? Select all applicable answers:
By injecting grease into the shaft by inserting the shaft nozzle between the cone and housing.
By injecting grease to the wire handle by inserting the nozzle into the housing through the handle guide.
By injecting grease into the shaft by inserting the handle into the housing through the handle guide.
By injecting grease to the wire handling by inserting the shaft nozzle between the cone and housing.
Next question
How would you properly grease turnbuckles?
By frequently greasing the hooked ends.
By frequently greasing the spindles.
By first cleaning dirty or rusty spindle threads and then applying grease to them.
Next question
How would you properly grease twistlocks? Select all applicable answers:
By frequently greasing the twistlock handles.
By frequently greasing the twistlock cones.
By frequently dismantling and greasing the inner twistlock springs.
By injecting grease into the shaft by a specially designed shaft nozzle.
By injecting grease to the wire handling by inserting the shaft handle into the housing through the handle guide.
Next question
How would you properly maintain the container lashing equipment on board your ship? Select all applicable answers:
By ensuring that the amount of lashing equipment was sufficient to properly secure the maximum number of containers to be carried.
By ensuring that adequate spares and replacements are carried.
By accepting that slightly distorted lashing rods could still be used to secure containers.
By accepting that fractured turnbuckle casings would not affect their integrity.
Next question
How would you recognise the onset of parametric rolling?
When your ship starts to roll in beam seas.
When your ship starts to encounter two waves during one roll cycle.
When your ship is pitched by the bow, at maximum roll to one side.
When upright, your ship is pitched down by the stern.
Next question
How would you recognise the possible onset of Parametric rolling? Select all applicable answers:
The ship experiences seas from astern.
The ship starts developing large roll angles within a very short time.
The ship rolls once for every two waves encountered.
The ship is pitched down by the bow when upright.
Next question
If a ship were to meet head-on seas, what would the change in the ship’s direction of motion result in? Select all applicable answers:
Decreasing forces on the container lashing system.
Forces being transmitted to the containers.
Tensile and compression forces being imposed on the lashing rods.
Decreasing forces on the containers.
Next question
If you were on a large container ship with flared bows and a flat, wide stern experiencing seas in near-gale conditions, what action would you take to avoid the possible onset of Parametric rolling?
Head your ship into the seas.
Run with the seas from astern.
Reduce speed to the minimum revolutions to which the ship will respond, under the circumstances.
Maintain sea speed and steer a course preferably with the seas approaching from close to the beam, so that roll and pitch motions do not synchronise.
Next question
If you were on a large container ship with flared bows and a wide, flat stern experiencing gale conditions, what action would you avoid taking? Select all applicable answers:
Heading your ship into the seas.
Heaving to.
Reducing speed to the minimum to which your ship will respond, under the circumstances.
Keeping the seas abeam.
Next question
In accordance with what should the lashing and securing of containers be carried out?
The stability booklet.
The CSM.
The manufacturers lashing equipment manual.
OSHA regulations.
Next question
In what sea condition will parametric rolling not be included?
In following seas.
In head seas.
In quartering seas.
In beam seas.
Next question
Once you have calculated the transverse forces acting on a particular container, what would you do with this information? Select all applicable answers:
Keep it on file for future reference.
Present the information to attending surveyors in the event of an investigation for that particular voyage.
Compare the information with the permissible transverse forces of the containers Classification Society.
Compare the information with the permissible forces given by the loading computer.
Next question
To what limits do lashing equipment manufacturers design their equipment?
To those imposed by Classification Societies.
To maximum roll amplitudes between 22 and 30 degrees.
To minimum standards laid down by leading manufacturers.
To IMO’s requirements.
Next question
Under OSHA regulations what item of container securing equipment is not feasible when using ordinary cranes? Select all applicable answers:
Fully automatic twistlocks.
Manual twistlocks.
Semi-automatic twistlocks.
Liftlocks.
Next question
Under OSHA regulations what inherent problems are associated with a container spreader suspended from a single point? Select all applicable answers:
It precludes the use of fully automatic twistlocks due to the suspension not being vertical at the four lifting points.
It precludes the use of semi-automatic twistlocks due to the suspension not being vertical at the four lifting points.
It does not allow the spreader to be lifted vertically at the four corner castings.
Containers cannot be lifted off their stacks in a vertical or relatively stable manner.
Next question
Under OSHA regulations, which of the following is a “positive container securing device”? Select all applicable answers:
A fully automatic twistlock.
A liftlock.
On-deck cell guides.
A safety stacker.
Next question
What action(s) would contribute to the prevention of lashing failure?
Leaving the lashing and securing of containers entirely to stevedores, because securing containers is part of their daily job.
Using portable and/or fixed items of securing equipment not specified in the Cargo Securing Manual (CSM).
Using wires to replace worn out lashing rods.
Mixing the container lashing systems on alternate container bays.
Being vigilant and constantly checking container lashings during cargo loading operations.
Next question
What action(s) would contribute to the prevention of lashing failure? Select all applicable answers:
Checking container lashings during cargo operations.
Inspecting base twistlocks regularly for wear-down and/or cracks.
Using only wires to secure containers on after bays, due to a shortage of lashing rods.
Securing turnbuckles to pad eyes that have slight cracks around then welded seams.
Next question
What are some of the basic causes for container stows to collapse? Select all applicable answers:
Incorrect application of the “wind” lashings.
Carrying heavier over lighter containers.
The use of left and right-hand twistlocks leading to the mistaken notion that the containers are “locked”.
Forty-five-foot-long containers stowed outboard.
Next question
What are some of the basic causes for container stows to collapse? Select all applicable answers:
Inadequate or incorrect securing.
Container stacks being too heavy and too high, overall.
Wind forces being ignored when deciding the method and system of lashing.
Repeated shock loads in a seaway.
Next question
What are the advantages of securing containers to a lashing bridge? Select all applicable answers:
The lashings typically extend to the bottom of the third tier of containers.
The lashings resist the overturning of containers.
Corner-post tension and compression reactions are reduced.
Container stacks will generally have higher permissible weights.
Next question
What are the disadvantages of securing containers to a Lashing Bridge? Select all applicable answers:
The lashings resist the overturning of containers.
Corner-post tension and compression reactions are reduced.
The lashing bridge becomes less effective as the longitudinal distance between it and the container increases.
The lashing bridge becomes less effective when stowing forty-foot containers in bays arranged for alternative forty-five foot or forty-eight foot containers.
Next question
What are the limitations of CSMs? Select all applicable answers:
They do not cover all permutations and eventualities to which a ship may be exposed.
They provide stowage and securing instructions for pre-approved load conditions only.
They do not cover all information provided by the loading computer.
They are often not updated in respect of new items or models of container lashing gear supplied to a vessel.
Next question
What are the responsibilities of a ship owner in ensuring that containers can safely be carried on board?
The owner must provide and maintain adequate supplies of container securing equipment.
The owner must ensure that the items supplied are of the required strength.
The owner must provide a comprehensive stowage and securing manual that is understood by the ship’s staff.
The owner must appoint a class surveyor to inspect newly supplied items.
Next question
What causes longitudinal accelerations? Select all applicable answers:
The rate of change of velocity.
A ship meeting head seas.
A ship influenced by stern seas.
The rate of change of velocity during pitching.
Next question
What causes vertical accelerations?
Only Heaving.
Only Heaving and Pitching.
Pitching, Rolling and Surging.
Heaving, Pitching and Rolling.
Next question
What causes, or contributes to, tipping? Select all applicable answers:
Heavy containers stowed over lighter ones.
Incorrect declarations of weights by shippers and/or load-planners.
Ship’s officer unable to precisely calculate the forces acting on a particular stow.
Pitching.
Next question
What contributes to the safe carriage of containers? Select all applicable answers:
In the absence of a CSM, lashing containers as on previous voyages.
Leaving the inspection of items of lashing equipment up to the Class surveyor.
Using twistlocks whenever possible.
Never exceeding stack weight(s).
Next question
What dangers are associated with attempting to steer out of following seas? Select all applicable answers:
Large course alterations are required.
Course alterations may result in rolling.
Large roll angles may quickly develop, setting up forces in the container lashing system.
The large roll angles will lead to Parametric Rolling.
Next question
What does heaving result in? Select all applicable answers:
Shearing of twistlocks.
Longitudinal accelerations that act on hatch pontoons.
Vertical accelerations that act along the corner posts of containers.
Possible piercing of tank tops or hatch pontoons by the lowest tiers of containers.
Next question
What does the integrity of a container lashing system depend upon?
The weakest component of that system.
The extent to which lashings rods are tightened.
The strongest item of lashing equipment.
The number of Bridge Fittings securing the containers.
Next question
What information do loading computers provide us with? Select all applicable answers:
Examples of the forces that can be expected in various stowage positions on board.
Facilities for automatic monitoring of individual stack weights.
Alarms when stack weight exceeds the designed maximum stack weight.
Heeling moments caused by wind loads.
Next question
What information is included in loading computers? Select all applicable answers:
Automatic monitoring of total individual stack weights.
Angles of roll and corresponding metacentric heights (GM) within specifications.
Alarms when stack weight exceeds the designed maximum stack weight.
Wind-load heeling moments.
Next question
What is the most important factor to be considered when deciding the lashing system for a sea route during a particular season?
The number of containers carried on deck.
The number of container stacks exposed to wind forces.
The extent of longitudinal accelerations.
The extent of transverse accelerations.
Next question
What is tipping?
A force that tends to pull out or separate corner castings or container twistlocks.
Container stacks falling over during rolling.
Containers in the uppermost stacks being racked sideways, due to transverse accelerations.
Containers displaced in the uppermost stacks due to pitching.
Next question
What led to the United States Coast Guards proposal to include carriage requirements for cargo securing manuals under SOLAS 74?
Ship collisions occurring regularly, off the US coast.
Recommendations from the International Hazardous Goods Committee.
The overboard loss of containers, from a ship, containing arsenic trioxide.
Several losses of containers, overboard.
Next question
What produces longitudinal accelerations?
Pitching and slamming.
Pitching, slamming, surging and yawing.
Surging and yawing.
Pitching and surging.
Next question
What should be maintained in the file covering items of lashing gear? Select all applicable answers:
Approval certificates for portable securing equipment on board.
An up to date inventory of container lashing equipment on board.
Appropriate remarks in respect of defective items.
New items supplied to the vessel, or requested for.
Next question
What stability variations contribute to parametric rolling of large container ships as they encounter two waves during one roll cycle?
Increased water plane areas with a wave through amidships.
Decreased stability as a wave crest passes amidships.
Smaller righting levers with a wave through amidships.
Larger residual stability as a wave crest passes amidships.
Next question
What would ensure the safe usage of deck fittings? Select all applicable answers:
That the main shafts on “D” rings are not wasted.
That welded seams along the main shafts on “D” rings are not cracked.
That key holes of deck foundations are not elongated, through wastage or diminution.
That moderate chafing has occurred on pad eyes by the repeated use of turnbuckles.
Next question
What would ensure the safe usage of dovetail foundations? Select all applicable answers:
That the chamfered edges are not, in any way, curled or distorted.
That a twistlock or sliding cone can easily slide into the foundation.
That the chamfered edges are waved.
That a twistlock or sliding cone can be vertically lifted out of the foundation.
Next question
What would help prevent container stows from collapsing?
Accepting last-minute containers presented for loading, upon instructions from charterers agents, regardless of their weights.
Mixing out-of-gauge containers, such as high-cubes, with standard units causing misalignment.
Using both, left and right-hand twistlocks.
Using sound items of securing equipment, whether fixed or portable.
Next question
What would you look for when inspecting bridge fittings? Select all applicable answers:
Proper lubrication of the item.
Seizing.
Buckling.
Elongation.
Next question
What would you look for when inspecting deck sockets? Select all applicable answers:
Signs of pitting.
Clogging of drain holes.
Cracking in welded seams.
Elongation of sockets.
Next question
What would you look for when inspecting lashing plates? Select all applicable answers:
Pitting.
Cracks in welded seams.
Plate distortion.
Reduction of plate thickness.
Next question
What would you look for when inspecting lashing rods? Select all applicable answers:
Signs of pitting.
Straightness of rods.
Stretching of rods.
Rod compression.
Next question
What would you look for when inspecting turnbuckles? Select all applicable answers:
Signs of pitting.
Seizing or cracking.
Bending.
Turnbuckle compression.
Next question
What would you look for when inspecting twistlocks? Select all applicable answers:
The spring holding the twistlock cones in a closed position is non-resilient.
The bases of twistlocks are not cracked.
“Sacrificial exchangeable wear plates”, where fitted, have not reached the predefined level of wear and tear.
Freedom of cone movement when operated by the handle.
Next question
What would you look for when inspecting “D” rings? Select all applicable answers:
Elongation.
Cracks in welded seams.
Deterioration of the retaining sleeve.
Wastage of the main shaft.
Next question
When do wind forces cause heeling moments on container ships? Select all applicable answers:
When there are high container stacks on deck.
When on-deck containers present a favourable profile to the wind.
When on-deck containers are block-stowed.
When on-deck containers are loaded two-high.
Next question
When does a container experience a force of 100 % of its weight plus cargo?
When pitching, in rotational motion.
When rolling, in rotational motion.
When rolling and pitching.
When heaving, in linear motion.
Next question
When will a ship experience “Resonance”? Select all applicable answers:
When it encounters two waves during one roll cycle.
When it encounters one wave during one roll cycle.
When it encounters beam seas.
When it encounters head seas.
Next question
When will parametric rolling occur? Select all applicable answers:
When a ship’s natural period of roll is approximately half the wave encounter period.
When a ship is meeting seas fine on the port bow.
When successive wavelengths are of the order between 0,8 and twice the ship’s length.
When wave heights exceed a critical level.
Next question
When will parametric rolling occur? Select all applicable answers:
When a ship’s natural period of roll is approximately half the wave encounter period.
When a ship is running with the seas from astern.
When roll and pitch motions occur in phase with each other.
When a ship’s low speed results in large roll amplitudes.
Next question
When will parametric rolling occur? Select all applicable answers:
When a ship experiences small roll amplitudes.
When a ship is running with the seas fine on the quarter.
When roll and pitch motions are in phase.
When a ship’s natural period of roll is equal to approximately twice the wave encounter period.
Next question
When will “Resonance” occur?
When a ship encounters two waves during one roll cycle, from beam seas.
When a ship encounters one wave during one roll cycle, from beam seas.
When a ship encounters bow seas.
When a ship encounters seas from its port and starboard quarters.
Next question
When would vertical accelerations reach their maximum values on the containers stowed in the forward and aft container bays?
When a ship is at its extreme pitch angle.
When a ship is at its extreme pitch and roll angles, simultaneously.
When a ship surges.
When a ship heaves.
Next question
When would you expect large roll amplitudes to occur? Select all applicable answers:
When the ship is experiencing beam seas.
When the ship is running before the seas.
When the ship is experiencing head seas.
When the seas are fine on the bow.
Next question
Where are the statutory requirements for the carriage of CSMs found? Select all applicable answers:
In the ship’s stability booklet.
In the company’s standing instructions.
In chapters six and seven of SOLAS.
In chapter four and five of SOLAS.
Next question
Where would you expect to find carriage requirements for cargo securing manuals, in SOLAS 74/78? Select all applicable answers:
Chapter III.
Chapter V.
Chapter VI.
Chapter VII.
Next question
Where would you find tools to assist in calculating wind pressure? Select all applicable answers:
In the CSM.
In the loading computer program.
In SOLAS.
In the stability booklet.
Next question
Where would you find tools to assist you with calculating wind forces? Select all applicable answers:
In the CSM.
From programs in the loading computer.
In Annex 13 to the Code of Safe Practice for Cargo Stowage and Securing (the CSS Code).
In SOLAS 74.
Next question
Which of these motions has a marked effect on a ship’s stability, whilst also affecting container corner posts and the cargo securing system in general?
Rolling.
Pitching.
Yawing.
Heaving.
Next question
Who can approve a CSM? Select all applicable answers:
The shipyard at which the vessel was built.
Manufacturers of the cargo securing equipment.
The Flag State.
The current Classification Society, on behalf of the Flag State.
Next question
Who was primarily responsible for proposing mandatory requirements for certain types and sizes of ships to carry a cargo securing manual?
The International Maritime Organization (IMO).
The International Hazardous Goods Committee.
The United States Coast Guard (USCG).
The Institute of International Container Lessors (IICL).
Next question
Why do acceleration forces differ somewhat from those shown in a ship’s CSM? Select all applicable answers:
Because acceleration values in the CSM are in excess of what is expected at sea.
Because acceleration values in the CSM are generally stated for all container ships.
Because acceleration values in the CSM are calculated prior to a ship entering sea service.
Because acceleration values in the CSM are “as anticipated”.
Next question
With respect of Classification Societies, what is the concern regarding container lashing equipment? Select all applicable answers:
Despite their respective rules and regulations, the industry still lacks a standard approach to the securing of containers aboard ships.
Rules applied by one Classification Society differ from another.
The risk level associated with container stowage in accordance with the various class rules is inconsistent.
Having been approved by Class, the information contained in the CSM is still unreliable.
Next question
With respect to OSHA requirements when can stevedores work on top of containers? Select all applicable answers:
When weather conditions permit.
When stevedores wear appropriate safety gear.
When a stevedore standing on deck, is trying to unlock a container stowed in a high tier by means of a long lashing pole.
When bridge clamps are to be installed.
Next question
With respect to container lashings, what could happen in heavy weather if the extreme pitch angle occurred simultaneously with heaving? Select all applicable answers:
Twistlock failure could occur.
Turnbuckles could fail.
Lashing bridges could collapse.
Hatch pontoon cleats could fail.
Next question
With respect to lashing bars and turnbuckles, which of the following statements is true? Select all applicable answers:
Lloyd’s Register (LR), Germanischer Lloyd (GL), Det Norske Veritas (DnV) and Bureau Veritas (BV) allow a SWL of 245 kN.
American Bureau of Shipping (ABS) allows a SWL of 293 kN.
All Classification Societies allow a SWL of 245 kN.
All Classification Societies allow a SWL of 293 kN.
Next question
With respect to twistlock springs, what would ensure their safe operation?
The spring, holding the twistlock cone in the “closed” position, should be resilent.
The spring, holding twistlock cone in a “closed” position, is resilient but loose.
Twistlock handles are slightly fractured.
Twistlock handles are missing.
Next question
* In some questions may be more, than one right answer.
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Май, 17, 2022 520 0
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