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Training LNGC Course for ABS and Service Project Managers & Project Management OG LNGC Project in Korea

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The Gas Carrier Course serves a critical purpose in preparing professionals for the specialized field of gas transportation at sea, with a particular focus on LNG carriers (LNGCs). The course aims to equip participants with comprehensive knowledge and skills related to the construction, operation, and management of LNG carriers. Participants undergo rigorous training to understand the unique characteristics and challenges associated with transporting liquefied natural gas, including safety protocols, cargo handling procedures, and emergency response measures.

The scope of the Gas Carrier Course encompasses various aspects essential for the construction of LNGCs, ensuring that participants gain a holistic understanding of the entire process. From the initial design phase to the final commissioning of vessels, the training program covers key topics such as naval architecture, marine engineering, gas containment systems, and regulatory compliance. Moreover, participants delve into advanced concepts such as cargo containment technology, boil-off gas management, and LNG bunkering operations, preparing them to navigate the complexities of the LNG shipping industry effectively. By providing a comprehensive curriculum and hands-on learning experiences, the Gas Carrier Course enables professionals to acquire the expertise needed to contribute to the safe and efficient operation of LNG carriers in the global maritime landscape.

Purpose and Scope of Gas Carrier Course

The training program for construction of LNGC’S

In order for a surveyor to be considered qualified to follow the construction of an LNGC either as Project Manager or Support Surveyor, he is to be fully qualified for the various tasks he is required to perform.

The full qualification training consists of three Parts as follows:

  • Classroom training (minimum 40 hours);
  • On-the-job training on cargo containment system installation;
  • On-the-job training on cargo handling and safety systems.

The Classroom training consists of a complete overview of the LNGC design, construction and operations. It is necessary in order to give to the surveyor a comprehensive technical knowledge to apply during on the job training.

Classroom course material is divided into twenty (20) self – standing modules, each covering a specific topic. This makes the training very flexible and adaptable to the work necessities and to the actual availability of the participants. Although the course has been designed for ABS surveyors, enrollment into the course may be extended to ABS Owners, who wish to take advantage of this unique training opportunity for their staff and shipyard, that may wish to give a general broad, comprehensive view of LNGC, to their personnel, which is in general specialized on specific aspects. In particular, division of the training into modules permits owners and shipyards to choose whether to attend the whole course or only those particular modules they feel most applicable to their staffing needs.

Cargo containment system installation training consists of the attendance to all operations relative to the installation of the complete Cargo containment system of gas vesselcargo containment system of at least one tank (or equivalent) under the guidance of a qualified surveyor who acts as a tutor during the installation of the cargo system of at least one new LNGC.

Cargo handling and safety systems training consists of the attendance to the testing of all plants and installations that are specific of LNG ships, including cold test and gas trials, under the guidance of a qualified surveyor who acts as a tutor, during the outfitting work of at least one new LNGC.

The Checklist

The training program described above is quite ambitious, requires a significant investment of time and resources and is composed of many subjects. In order to keep track that a surveyor has actually attended all the steps contemplated by this program and to be sure that no parts of it has been missed, all participants will be supplied with check lists, where all the listed steps may be checked off as soon as they are completed.

The scope of the classroom training

The aim of the classroom training is to give to the surveyors a broad view of the LNG business, the hazards of LNG, the evolution of the LNG ships and their peculiarities and the future developments. Any one of the topics that will be dealt with in a couple of hours in the classroom training would require a dedicated training course in order to be deeply and fully developed. Of course, it will be not possible to give too detailed lectures on all the subjects of the course. This would be also beyond the purpose of the classroom training.

In fact, the surveyor is supposed to acquire the necessary expertise to perform his daily job properly and with the necessary competence by the on-the-job training. No one might declare himself to be an expert on LNG in general or on any of the lectured subjects by only having attended this class. Our ambition is to put a surveyor in condition to discuss any aspect of the LNG business with competent persons at least understanding what they are talking about and, even without a deep expertise, demonstrating a general knowledge of the involved problems, as well as to start the on-the-job training having a general idea of all possible aspects and implication of their job.

It is possible to have some duplication or overlap of subjects in the course. This is mainly due to the necessity to make each module as far as possible self-standing, to stress the most important concepts, to remind, when necessary, some very basic concepts that might have been lost in the previous lectures. In particular, certain subjects relative to the various cargo containment systems and to the cargo handling operations will be purposely given twice:

  • the first time in a generic way, to give a preliminary general understanding of the various possible features and of their merits;
  • the second time for deepening the knowledge of the peculiarities of each feature.

Subjects dealt with in the training course

The following is the table of content of the Classroom training:

Classroom Learning Modules

Module 1 Introduction

Part 1 – LNG BUSINESS AND HISTORY OF ABS INVOLVEMENT WITH GAS TRANSPORTATION AT SEA

  • World energy demand;
  • Energy transportation – Ships versus pipelines;
  • Comparison between LNG and oil;
  • ABS experience with LNG Carriers.

Part 2 – LNGC TRAINING COURSE FOR ABS PROJECT MANAGERS AND SURVEYORS & PROJECT MANAGEMENT OG LNGC PROJECTS IN KOREA

  • Purpose and scope of the course;
  • Surveys of new Gas Carriers in Korea;
  • Project management for LNG projects;
  • The ABS LNG Focus Group.

Module 2 LNG

  • Definition of LNG;
  • Methane;
  • Definition of LPG;
  • Chemistry of gases;
  • Definitions and physical properties of gases;
  • Hazards of liquefied gas cargoes;
  • Summary of methane hazards and emergency procedures.

Module 3 Rules and Regulations

  • LNG carrier specification;
  • The IMO Gas Codes;
  • The ABS Rules;
  • The USCG Rules;
  • LNG Carrier characteristics;
  • Hazardous areas.

Module 4 Cargo Containment System for LNG Carriers and Cargo Operations – General

Part 1 – CARGO CONTAINMENT SYSTEMS FOR LNG CARRIERS

  • LNGC projects;
  • Cargo containment systems;
  • Existing LNG vessels cargo containment system concepts;
  • Comparison of cargo containment systems.

Part 2 – LNG SHIP OPERATION – A General Overview of Aerating, Inerting and Cooling of Cargo Tanks

  • Typical cargo operations;
  • Inertization of interbarrier spaces (membrane tank vessels only).

Module 5 Hull Construction

  • Difference between LNGC’s and Tankers;
  • Hull temperatures and material selection;
  • Heating of cofferdams;
  • Structural details and fatigue;
  • Sloshing and filling ratio;
  • SAFEHULL construction monitoring;
  • Hull structural analysis;
  • Steel fracture modes;
  • Stability analysis.

Module 6 Advanced Analysis

Part 1 – ABS ADVANCED ANALYSIS FOR LNGC

  • Engineering analysis applicable to LNG carriers.

Part 2 – PRESENTATION ON ABS ADVANCED ANALYSIS

  • Typical presentation given by LNG Focus Group to ABS potential customers.

Module 7 Independent Cargo Tanks

  • Type “A” tanks;
  • Type “B” spherical tanks;
  • Type “B” prismatic tanks;
  • Type “C” tanks.

APPENDIX 1 – CHARACTERISTICS OF ALUMINUM ALLOYS & ALUMINUM WELDING METHODS AND PROCEDURES Characteristics of aluminum alloys

  • Aluminum welding;
  • Welding defects.

APPENDIX 2 – WELDING OF STAINLESS STEEL FOR LNG APPLICATIONS Material characteristics

  • Stainless steel welding;
  • Welding defects.

Module 8 Membrane Cargo Tanks – MARK III System Principles and Components

Part 1 – MEMBRANE CARGO TANKS

  • Membrane tanks;
  • MARK III system;
  • NO.96 system;
  • CS1 system;
  • Interbarrier spaces – Pressurization, Inertization;
  • Scaffolding erection.

Part 2 – MARK III SYSTEM COMPONENTS

  • Components.

Module 9 MARK III – Insulation Installation

  • MARK III containment system preparation for installation;
  • MARK III containment system installation steps;
  • Conditioning of the inner hull;
  • Stud welding;
  • Mastic application;
  • Panel erection;
  • Bonding of secondary barrier triplex;
  • Bonding of steel corner/hardwood key assembly;
  • Bonding of top bridge pads;
  • Insulation completion – Protection and final check.

Module 10 MARK III – Membrane Instalation

  • Membrane erection;
  • Membrane test;
  • Primary barrier global test;
  • Secondary barrier tightness test.

Module 11 GT 96 Membrane System – Installation

  • Hold planarity and coupling installation;
  • Construction of insulation boxes;
  • Installation of boxes to the inner hull;
  • Installation of INVAR tubes in corners;
  • Installation of secondary barrier and insulation space;
  • Testing and evacuation of secondary barrier;
  • Installation of insulation boxes to primary or interbarrier space;
  • Installation of primary barrier.

Module 12 GT 96 Membrane System – Special Locations and Pump Tower Installation

  • Special locations;
  • Testing and evacuation of primary barrier;
  • Fabrication and testing of pump column/tower.

Module 13 Electrical Equipment for Hazardous Areas & High – Voltage Electric Plants

Part 1 – PROTECTION OF THE ELECTRIC EQUIPMENT & ELECTRICAL EQUIPMENT FOR HAZARDOUS AREAS

  • Enclosures and degree of protection;
  • Electrical equipment temperature classes;
  • Hazardous areas;
  • Certified-safe-type equipment;
  • Installation of electrical equipment in hazardous areas;
  • Summary of spaces in which certified-safe-type electrical equipment is located on board an LNGC;
  • Appendix.

Part 2 – HIGH VOLTAGE ELECTRIC PLANTS

  • Planning flow of power supply systems;
  • Reasons for selecting high-voltage systems;
  • Features of high-voltage systems;
  • Safety features in high-voltage systems;
  • Actual applications;
  • Maintenance.

Module 14 Cargo Handling and other Systems Installation

  • Cargo handling system (liquid and vapor);
  • Tank venting and relief systems;
  • Interbarrier and insulation spaces pressurization and inerting system;
  • Inert gas system and dry air system;
  • Cargo system operations;
  • Dome arrangement;
  • Cofferdam heating systems;
  • Hull ventilation system and cofferdam arrangement;
  • Interbarrier space drain system;
  • Insulation space drain system;
  • Jettison;
  • Fire fighting systems.

Module 15 Machinery, Equipment and Components for LNG Cargo Handling System

  • Cargo pumps;
  • Cargo compressors;
  • Boil-off warm-up heaters;
  • Vaporizers;
  • Relief valves;
  • Nitrogen generators;
  • Inert gas generators;
  • Miscellaneous equipment.

APPENDIX – ABS REQUIREMENTS – INTERPRETATIONS, EXPLANATIONS – Process Pressure Vessels and Liquid, Vapor, and Pressure Piping Systems

Module 16 Propulsion

  • Steam turbines;
  • Reduction gears;
  • Overview of a 36 000 SHP KAWASAKI cross – compound turbine;
  • Steam conditioning;
  • Alternative propulsion – Diesels.

APPENDIX – LNG Ship Propulsion: Is Diesel the Future? LNG Ship Propulsion: Is Diesel the Future?

Module 17 Safety and Control System

  • Cargo control room;
  • Integrated automation system;
  • Custody transfer system;
  • Emergency shut-down system;
  • Remote sounding system and very high level alarm system;
  • Boil-off control system;
  • Nitrogen control systems;
  • Gas detection system;
  • Fire detection system;
  • Water detection system in secondary barrier space.

Module 18 Surveys on Existing LNG Ships
Part 1 – SURVEYS ON EXISTING LNG CARRIERS

  • Introduction;
  • IMO surveys;
  • List of survey requirements for LNG carriers;
  • Annual surveys;
  • Intermediate surveys;
  • Special surveys.

Part 2 – SURVEYS BASED ON RELIABILTY CENTERED MAINTENANCE

  • Maintenance philosophy.

Module 19 Floating LNG Terminals – Future Trends and Technologies

  • Floating LNG terminals;
  • Perspectives on natural gas;
  • Key natural gas priorities and challenges;
  • Gas to liquid (GTL);
  • Compressed natural gas (CNG).

Module 20 Safety Records and De – Briefing

Part 1 – RISKS CONNECTED WITH TRANSPORTATION OF LNG AT SEA

  • Premise;
  • Safety aspects of LNG carriers;
  • Further studies.

Part 2 – RISKS CONNECTED WITH TRANSPORTATION OF LNG AT SEA

  • Glossary and definitions.

APPENDIX – EQUIPMENT LIST FOR MEMBRANE TYPE LNGC

On-The-Job Training – first part cargo containment system installation

In general, the on-the-job training relative to the cargo containment installation consists in the active participation of the trainee to all the inspections relative to the installation and testing of the cargo containment system of a whole tank, under the guidance of the project manager and/or of the support surveyor, who would act as tutor. In general this operation would require a minimum of four months.

However, considering that in general the cargo containment system is installed at different times in different tanks, in some cases it would be possible to speed – up this operation following different steps of the installations in different tanks, this procedure might reduce the time of the training to about 2 ½ months.

In this case the minimum number of items to be inspected by the trainee under the supervision of a qualified surveyor is the following:

1 HOLD PLANARITY AND STUD INSTALLATION

  • Hold planarity;
  • Stud installation and welding.

2 INSTALLATION OF INSULATION PANELS

  • Epoxy mastic application;
  • Installation of flat panels;
  • Installation of corner panels;
  • Installation of three-way panels;
  • Filling insulation gaps.

3 SECONDARY BARRIER INSTALLATION

  • Bonding and installation of flat triplex;
  • Bonding and installation of corner triplex;
  • Bonding and installation of three-way triplex;
  • Vacuum inspections.

4 TOP BRIDGE PAD INSTALLATION

  • Top bridge pad installation;
  • Final verification before installing the primary membrane.

5 PRIMARY MEMBRANE INSTALLATION

  • Check of welding procedures;
  • Fit-up of membrane sheets;
  • Welding of the membrane;
  • Visual inspection;
  • NDT.

6 TIGHTNESS AND STRENGTH TESTS

  • NH3 test;
  • Global tests.

7 INSTALLATION OF THE PUMP TOWER

8 COLD TEST

The minimum number of inspections required for each of the above items will be agreed on case-by-case basis with the Overall Project Manager.

On-The-Job Training – second part cargo handling and safety system

Trainee is required to attend tests and trials (as applicable) of the following systems, including related alarm and control systems at least once:

  1. Cargo System;
  2. Cargo Tank Vent System;
  3. Boil-off System;
  4. Inert Gas System;
  5. Interbarrier/insulation Spaces Pressurization and Inerting System and Draining Systems;
  6. Cofferdam Heating System;
  7. Electrical Systems and Apparatus in Hazardous Areas;
  8. Fire Fighting System in Cargo Area;
  9. Cargo Level, Pressure and Temperature Control System;
  10. Custody Transfer System;
  11. Fire Detection and Fire Fighting Control System;
  12. Gas Detection System and Emergency Shut – Down System.

Surveys of new gas carriers in Korea

ABS is investing significant amount of time, resources and personnel in order to train and maintain a highly qualified staff of surveyors capable of providing all the surveys and services needed by our and future clients.

ABS objective is to maintain and improve its capability to supply excellent service during the construction of new LNGC and to become the Classification Society leader in the classification of LNG ships.

The gas carrier survey group

ABS is the only Classification Society to have organized and implemented a separate Group of Surveyors dedicated exclusively to work on the Types, Layouts and Designs of the Liquefied Gas Carriers (LNG/LPG)Gas Carriers, which are built in Korea.

This Group, which is called GAS CARRIER SURVEY GROUP (or GAS CARRIER SURVEY TEAM) is presently composed by 25 surveyors of various Nationalities and is likely to grow shortly to 30 – 35 and even more as soon as the demand of LNG ships increases. The appointment to the group of new surveyors is scheduled taking into account the dates of starting of new LNG ship constructions, allowing them the time necessary for their proper training. Figure 1 is a photo of the some members of the Gas Carrier Group.

Photo - The Group of Gas Carrier
Fig. 1 Gas Carrier Survey Group

Why does ABS have a separate Gas Carrier Survey Group?

ABS has created the Gas Carrier Survey Group:

  • to consistenly apply and interpret ABS Rules and IGC Code Code requirements over different projects and diffrent shipyards in Korea;
  • to create a group of specialist LNG surveyors for both ABS Korea and worldwide offices. The intent is for surveyors assigned to LNG Group to nly work on gas carriers in rder to cntinually increase their knowledge of these vessels and not switch around different types of vessels;
  • to provide a forum to exchange knowledge, information, problems and solutions in classification of gas carriers, to provides assurance to Customers that the ABS Project Team assigned to a project:
  1. are fully trained, knowledgeable and experienced;
  2. are aware of problems encountered in fabrication of LNG carriers for other Owners and other Shipyards;
  3. are not alone, but are fully supported by a group of specialized LNG personnel;
  4. any replacement that might be necessary due to absence of one or more team member due to transfer, training periods, vacations, illness, etc remains smooth and does not affect the qualty of the service.

Composition of the Gas Carrier Group

The team mixes several different experiences and know – how, collecting people of different background, as follows:

  • Fully experienced and qualified ABS surveyors already experienced on the construction, outfitting and operation of LNG;
  • Fully experienced and qualified ABS surveyors, without or with partial experience on the construction of LNG ships, to be trained to achieve their qualification to follow the construction of a new LNG project;
  • Experts on LNG construction and operation purposely hired to join the team, still to be trained on ABS procedures and philosophy, before being considered qualified to attend a new LNG project.

The aforementioned training program ensures that all Gas Carrier Survey Group members have the same high level of knowledge that will allow them to carry pout the duties of project management of the construction of a LNGC, to the full satisfaction of our clients.

Gas Carrier Group Coordination and contact points

The Gas Carrier Survey Group is a unique Organization which requires team work and cooperation among the Principal Surveyors involved. The Group is coordinated by Raffaele Piciocchi – Principal Surveyor Korea Gas Carriers.

Client’s primary point of contact should be the Project Manager of each project. The ABS Project Manager contacts the Principal Surveyor – Korea Gas Carriers, who takes decisions in consulation with the other principal surveyors.

Read also: Project Management of the Large-Scale Liquefied Natural Gas Facilities

The LNG Survey Group Lead Surveyor, is rsponsible of the operation of the Group in the absence of the Principal Surveyor – Korea Gas carriers.

Figure 2 shows the organization and the communication lines within the Gas Carrier Group.

Scheme - The GCG lines of organization and communication
Fig. 2 The Organization and Communication lines within the GCG

The Gas Carrier Task Force

The Gas Carrier Group is supported by a LNG Task Force, which is composed by individuals with extensive background experience in the following disciplines:

  • All disciplines (P. Riley).
  • LNG ships operations, cargo handling and safety features (G. H. Lee).
  • Cargo containment systems (S. Le Moigne).
  • Electrical and automation plants (A. Vasiliache).
  • Machinery installations (C. Hirai).
  • LPG (J. Guzman).

This Gas Carrier Task Force participates in survey of critical items on all LNG Carriers and is always at the disposal of Project Teams, Owners Representatives and Shipyards to discuss critical issues, answer questions and to instruct trainees in the respective fields of competence.

The Training Team

Part of the Gas Carrier Group is also the Gas Training Team. The Instructors of this team are:

1 CLASSROOM TRAINING

  • R. Piciocchi;
  • P. Riley.

2 ON-THE-JOB TRAINING

  • P. Riley;
  • I. Y. Jeong;
  • Project Managers.

Project Manning

For the purpose of this paragraph we define “PROJECT” a number of sister ships built by the same shipyard for the same owner with a certain continuity. Two identical ships built at the same time for different owners are considered two different PROJECTS. A second group of ships identical to first group of the same owner, which construction starts after six months-one year since the delivery of the last ship of the first group is considered a different PROJECT.

For each PROJECT, ABS provides a standard survey staff composed by a dedicated project manager for the whole project and, for each ship of the PROJECT, at least one dedicated support surveyor for each of the typical phases of construction of a LNG ship, according with the scheme in table, where a PROJECT consisting of two sister – ships has been considered. Of course, the table is valid for PROJECTS made by any number of ships just adding or subtracting columns.

Table shows the construction of a LNG ship has been roughly divided into three periods. In general, as far as possible, the Support Surveyor who has been assigned to the first step (hull construction) preferably and as compatible with other commitments will follow the same ship as dedicated Support Surveyor during the subsequent phases, if he is already qualified to follow them.

LNG Project manning
Type of InspectionsShip N. 1Ship N. 2
Whole project responsibilityProject Manager (dedicated to the PROJECT)
Hull Construction and Erection (including Traditional Machinery Istallation)
(from steel cutting to launching – about 9 months per ship)
– Project Manager
– At least one Support Surveyor qualified to attend traditional new constructions (other than LNG ships)
– Trainees, if and how deemed necessary
– Project Manager
– At least one Support Surveyor qualified to attend traditional new constructions (other than LNG ships)
– Trainees, if and how deemed necessary
Cargo Constainment System Installation ( from launching to completion of cargo containment system installation – about 6 months)– Project Manager
– One Support Surveyor qualified for cargo containment system
– Trainees, if and how deemed necessary
– Project Manager
– One Support Surveyor qualified for cargo containment system
– Trainees, if and how deemed necessary
Cargo Handling and Safety Systems ( from starting of testing and trials of systems to the delivery – about three months)– Project Manager
– At least one dedicated Support Surveyor qualified to attend cargo handling and safety systems
– Trainees, if and how deemed necessary
– Project Manager
– At least one dedicated Support Surveyor qualified to attend cargo handling and safety systems
– Trainees, if and how deemed necessary

If he is not yet qualified to follow the subsequent phases, other already qualified Support Surveyors will be assigned for the second and the third phases of the construction. As far as possible, the surveyor, who attended the first phase as Support Surveyor, will continue to attend the same ship as Trainee during the subsequent phases.

For particular projects, the scheme indicated in Table may be modified in accordance with ABS necessities and with the agreement of the Owner/Shipyard.

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